Tomorrow appoints first Artist in Residence

Jason Skinner has been named Tomorrow’s first Artist in Residence. He will produce original illustrations and artwork to complement our news, features, investigations and other content, as well as helping us deliver our core principles and building community through news.

He describes his first piece for Tomorrow as speaking “to the ability of mobile communication technology to completely engulf us, block out the hustle and bustle of the world around us and entrap us in a situation that could be miles away. The figure in the piece has a sad/upset look on his face as he stares into his phone, meanwhile all around him the world wizzes by”.

Phone Stop World, by Jason Skinner

“This piece speaks to the ability of mobile communication technology to completely engulf us, block out the hustle and bustle of the world around us and entrap us in a situation that could be miles away. The figure in the piece has a sad/upset look on his face as he stares into his phone, meanwhile all around him the world wizzes by.” – by Jason Skinner, Artist in Residence. Creative Commons, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported

Jason was born just outside of Toronto, Ontario, and trained at Sheridan College before moving to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he is currently based. During time with NSCAD, where he is an instructor, he was an artist in residence based in Lunenburg and has had a number of exhibitions throughout the province and elsewhere in Canada.

Find out more about Jason at http://www.jasonskinner.ca

 

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