Justice must be seen to be done – both by reporters and the public

Paris Métro moveable walkway has two speeds - just like free speech in court reporting. Photo by Tristan Stewart-Robertson

Paris Métro moveable walkway has two speeds – just like free speech in court reporting. Photo by Tristan Stewart-Robertson

Reporter and directing editor Tristan Stewart-Robertson has presented a paper at the London Conference in Critical Thought 2013 titled “The two speeds of free speech in court reporting”, examining the fundamentals behind Tomorrow’s seventh core principle: justice must be seen to be done. Read the full paper here (20130606.twospeedsFINAL.CT).

If you were to merge the UN Declaration of Human Rights articles 10 and 19, you could develop an  “open justice article”:

“Regardless of frontiers”, everyone has the “freedom to seek, receive and impart information”, at a “public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal”, which is guaranteed by right.

Or, alternatively:

Everyone has the right to public trial, where anyone and everyone has the “freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers”. 

What do you think? How should open justice be applied to courts and journalism?

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